Native American Art Works from Santa Fe 2002                             Page 1 of 1

Go To: Luciano Family Home                 Go To: Santa Fe 2002 Intro


     (Click on the Small Images to See Full-size Picture.)     

P01-2002-1111-2325-44A-EM.jpg P02-2002-1111-2331-13A-EM.jpg P03-2002-1111-2327-27A-EM.jpg
This is our dining room table with the wool runner that we purchased in the Povijemu Gallery on the Santa Clara Pueblo from Ken Tafoya. It was hand-woven by Dorothy Gallegos, the grandmother of Claudette Gallegos, whom we met in the gallery.

P04-2002-1114-2226-33A-EM.jpg P05-2002-1114-2247-30A-EM.jpg P06-GonzalesPot-3D-Icon.jpg

Click on the image above to see a 3D Object Animation.

This is a 5 1/2-inch "Swish Bowl", so called because it contains a small piece of coral, turquoise or silver bead inside, whcih make a swishing sound when you twirl the pot. This is a unique concept of the famous potter, Barbara Gonzales, the great-granddaughter of the now legendary San Ildefonso potter, Maria Martinez. We acquired this pot in Barbara's Sunbeam Gallery on the San Ildefonso Pueblo the day after she completed it. It is modeled after the seed pots of the ancient Native Americans. What would normally be an open hole on top, is covered by a turquoise stone. The engravings contain the legendary water serpent on a spider web and the traditional eagle feathers accented by turquoise and coral stones. On the side is a spider, a symbol of good luck and Barbara's logo, accented by a coral stone which represents the female, while turquoise represents the male.

P07-2002-1115-0034-10A-EM.jpg P08-2002-1115-0035-40A-EM.jpg P09-FuentesPot-Icon.jpg

Click on the image above to see a 3D Object Animation.

We bought this 3 1/2-inch pot from the young Native American artist, Lorenzo Fuentes, at the Native American Market under the Portico of the Palace of Governors in downtown Santa Fe. Lorenzo is from the Santa Clara Pueblo and produces these unique designs with the traditional black coloring accenting the original brown clay. The engraved design contains a jackrabbit with turquoise eye, a yucca plant, and eagle feathers.

P10-2002-1115-0048-56A-EM.jpg P11-Storyteller-Icon.jpg

Click on the image above to see a 3D Object Animation.

We bought this 5-inch tall traditional "Storyteller" figurine from Caroline Sando, of the Jemez Pueblo, while she was selling her works under the Portico of the Palace of Governors in downtown Santa Fe. Her unique storyteller designs usually contain one or more pieces of turquoise. This particular one has 7 children, a traditionally lucky number.


Go To: Luciano Family Home                 Go To: Santa Fe 2002 Intro